Videos

Abstract: The south slave region of the Great Slave Lake in the Northwest Territories of Canada is the home of the Łutsël K’é Dene First Nation (LKDFN) (Pelly, 1996). Like many Indigenous communities across Canada, the Denesoline relationships with their ancestral lands have become increasingly more vulnerable due to ecological, and sociological changes occurring in the sub-arctic regions of Canada (Holmes et al, 2016; Asfeldt & Henderson, 2010; Pelly 1996). Previous studies indicate how these changes affect the livelihoods of Denesoline communities but tend to ignore the contemporary spaces wherein Denesoline livelihoods are present. This study builds upon current literature by contextualising the positive and negative aspects of ecological and social change within the experiences of LKDFN representatives participating in a multi-day travel experience. This study illuminates Denesoline livelihoods in the present through the application of Northern, Indigenous, community-based research and by illuminating the knowledge through the narratives of land users, elders, and youth involved. The study’s principle aim has been to work in partnership with LKDFN representatives to document how traditional land-based knowledge and narratives can contribute to Dene self-determination, land and water governance, and cultural livelihoods. ...

Water Levels • Losing shoreline • Decreased large flood events • Sloughs and ponds on the landscape drying up and disappearing Water Flow • Slave River current significantly weaker • Decrease in driftwood flow into Great Slave Lake • Decrease in winter ice thickness (from 6 feet to 2 feet) Water Quality • In some areas the water is drinkable (East Arm) Some not (Dettah - arsenic) • Effect of Bennett Dam – increased river siltiness Changes in Fish Health • Increased observations of flesh sores and soft flesh...

The Mackenzie Delta is an important freshwater system that is vulnerable to multiple stressors, including: 1. Climate change impacts in the Arctic 2. Resource development activities (oil & natural gas) Ø Upstream-downstream linkages These pressures can affect traditional livelihoods1, including fishing since the Inuvialuit rely on the land for their subsistence but also for their wellbeing. This research seeks to effectively mobilize Local and Traditional Knowledge (LTK) to understand the significance of social and ecological changes in Inuvialuit fisheries in the Mackenzie Delta. Key research questions: 1. What are the social and ecological changes in freshwater systems that are currently observed by the fishers in the ISR? 2. What are the indicators and methods used by fishers to identify and understand these changes? 3. How do/are these changes affect/expected to affect fishing livelihoods and to a greater extent Indigenous communities in the ISR?...

In recent years, the effects of climate change have become increasingly visible in northern Canada; its impact on northern Indigenous peoples has become a particularly important area of research and policy (Nuttall et. al. 2005; Ficke, Myrick & Hansen 2007). While much focus has been on the experiences of high arctic communities, less is known about the effects of climate change on the livelihoods of those living in the sub-arctic including the Mackenzie River Basin (Caine, Davison & Stewart, 2009; Budreau & McBean 2007; Got’ine peoples of Dé lin̨e,andtheirfishinglivelihoods,for example, may be affected by such problems as rising temperatures, erratic weather events and changing precipitation patterns (Cohen 1997). This has implications for food security and well- being; fishing not only contributes to necessary food resources, but also underpins healthy respectful relationships between people and cultural landscapes such as Great Bear Lake (Andrews & Buggey, 2012). Preliminary research in the region suggests that warming temperatures are already having an effect on the quality, population, diversity of fish being harvested and by extension the food security of the community (Martin and Simmons 2016)....

Traditional Knowledge: Legends and Stories • Spirit power – derived from the spiritual relationship between people and animals. • Animals often have more power than humans. • Creation stories speak of animal power, great floods and fires. • Connection with other northern peoples....

Arapaima (Arapaima spp.) is the largest freshwater scale fish in the world, and an iconic element of the Amazon region. This fish yields high ecological, economic and cultural value to Amazonian ecosystems and people. Whereas in the past arapaima could reach up to 3 m long and weigh up to 200 kg, currently large specimens rarely exceed 1.5 m and 90 kg due to overfishing[1]. Since the 2000s, arapaima fishery has been banned in Brazil except under a collaborative management plan approved by the government. Arapaima co-management plans are proliferating throughout the Amazon, and seem to be an important tool for biodiversity conservation[2], poverty alleviation, and gender equality in fisheries....

Water is an essential part of life and viable sources of clean and drinkable water is a challenge for many people across the planet. Unfortunately, this challenge exists for many First Nation communities across Canada as seen by a series of reports and investigations that have appeared over the last 30 years across the nation. This research examines how members of two Dene First Nation Communities in Northern Canada perceive the degree of safety and security of their sources of drinking water, both within their homes and natural water sources....

Hydroelectric development has had numerous impacts on local fishing communities. For those living along the Mun River the Pak Mun Dam has severely impacted their livelihoods. However as 25 years have passed, locals have adapted their knowledge to survive the changing ecology. The aim of this project is to collect and synthesize traditional knowledge from local fishing communities and document the impacts of the Pak Mun Dam. As well as this project aims to examine the livelihood adaptations made since the commission of the Pak Mun Dam. Most of the knowledge shared may be socio-cultural and economic. It might also be ecological and include information about water flow, fish ecology etc. These socio-economic and ecological perspectives are interrelated as ecological impacts have a major effect on households and communities reliant on the river for harvesting food, water, jobs, and development....

Fishers have been tracking change in the same places, in the same ways, using the same signs and signals for many generations.......

The Mekong basin is one of the richest areas of biodiversity in the world, yet one of the most undiscovered. 20,000 plant species, 430 mammals, 1,200 birds, 800 reptiles and amphibians, and an estimated 850 fresh water fish species, are found in this very remote Asian region. MYSTERIES OF THE MEKONG is a not-to-be-missed wildlife series that will truly be a feast for the eyes....

Narrated by celebrated northern journalist Paul Andrew, Cold Amazon tells the story of Canada’s massive Mackenzie River Basin. At 1.8 million sq. kilometres, covering three provinces and all three territories, the Mackenzie plays a significant environmental, economic and spiritual role that stretches far beyond its borders. This short documentary highlights the importance and vulnerability of the mighty watershed through the impassioned voices of those who rely on its health and work for its protection. Working with Yellowknife-based filmmakers Pablo Saravanja and Jay Bulckaert of aRTLeSS Collective, and journalist Tim Querengesser, this film will bring the Mackenzie closer to home for the many Canadians who may be unaware of its importance, or even its existence....